How Deep Sea Divers Use Math (Math in the Real World) by Sheri L Arroyo

By Sheri L Arroyo

Even if looking for shipwrecks, new species, or misplaced civilizations less than the waters' depths, deep sea divers use math to maintain themselves secure and alive. How Deep Sea Divers Use Math indicates how those underwater explorers use math to delve into the inner most oceans on a daily basis.

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Extra resources for How Deep Sea Divers Use Math (Math in the Real World)

Example text

42 starfish (6 x 7 = 42). 2. 44 sea urchins (4 x 11 = 44). 3. 180 snails (9 x 20 = 180). Pages 24-25: Diving for the Navy: 1. They protect against scrapes and stings. They can be used with a hood, boots, and gloves. They provide some protection against body heat loss. 2. Dry suit. 3. Wet suit. 4. It doesn’t allow water in. Pages 26-27: Antarctic Research: 1. August. 2. 39 degrees colder (the difference between -58 degrees at Base #2 and -19 degrees at Base #3). 3. January, February, November, December.

Pages 6-7: Scuba Diving in the Sunlit Zone: 1. 150 minutes. 2. 60 minutes (80 – 20 = 60). 3. 30 minutes (80 – 50 = 30). 4. 80 minutes, which is equal to 1 hour and 20 minutes. Pages 8-9: How Far Can I See? January: 200 feet. August: 80 feet. Visibility is greater in colder water than in warmer water. The water temperature is colder in January than in August. Pages 10-11: Diving into the Deep: 1. You need an unlined thermoplastic wet suit. 2. Foam Neoprene wet suit with hood, vest, boots, and gloves.

Sunlit zone. 2. Abyssal zone. 3. Twilight zone. Pages 6-7: Scuba Diving in the Sunlit Zone: 1. 150 minutes. 2. 60 minutes (80 – 20 = 60). 3. 30 minutes (80 – 50 = 30). 4. 80 minutes, which is equal to 1 hour and 20 minutes. Pages 8-9: How Far Can I See? January: 200 feet. August: 80 feet. Visibility is greater in colder water than in warmer water. The water temperature is colder in January than in August. Pages 10-11: Diving into the Deep: 1. You need an unlined thermoplastic wet suit. 2. Foam Neoprene wet suit with hood, vest, boots, and gloves.

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