Deviant Peer Influences in Programs for Youth: Problems and by Kenneth A. Dodge, Thomas J. Dishion, Jennifer E. Lansford

By Kenneth A. Dodge, Thomas J. Dishion, Jennifer E. Lansford

Such a lot interventions for at-risk formative years are workforce dependent. but, study shows that adolescents usually learn how to develop into deviant through interacting with deviant friends. during this very important quantity, top intervention and prevention specialists from psychology, schooling, criminology, and similar fields examine how, and to what quantity, courses that mixture deviant early life really advertise challenge habit. A wealth of facts is reviewed on deviant peer impacts in such settings as remedy teams, replacement colleges, boot camps, workforce houses, and juvenile justice amenities. particular feedback are provided for bettering latest companies, and promising substitute ways are explored.

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Extra resources for Deviant Peer Influences in Programs for Youth: Problems and Solutions (The Duke Series in Child Develpment and Public Policy)

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If one conceptualizes deviance as a disease, then contact with deviant individuals would be seen as disinhibiting similar behavior among the members. Again, contextual conditions can moderate the spread of deviance within a group. For example, groups that provided reinforcement for deviance would be those that resulted in a high rate of change. This effect would be most pronounced in groups where there is a higher density of deviant individuals. Empirically, the contagion model would predict that group-level effects would predominate.

She referred to this motivational theory as construct theory. The theoretical perspective is derived from the criminological theories of Shaw and McKay (1972) and Cohen (1955). This theory is decidedly cognitive with respect to the mechanism. McCord proposed that individuals derive meaning from their interactions with significant others, including both peers and adults. They listen, watch, and observe others interacting with their world. The end 24 INTRODUCTION result of this process is that they learn, through observation and thinking, a motivational framework for their own future behavior.

Public school environments, for example, can create a readiness for gang activity by virtue of the systemic dynamics among youth of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, peer relations, and relations among ethnic groups. Coupled with media portrayals of gangs, interventions designed to prevent gang involvement in some settings could have the disturbing effect of actually increasing and solidifying such behavior (Klein, Chapter 13, this volume). Similarly, juvenile correction facilities may or may not provide contextual cues that are supportive of delinquent lifestyles.

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