Critical Approaches to Literature by David Daiches

By David Daiches

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18 Biswas is Shakespeare's poor unaccommodated man. His often repeated chant from schooldays that 'ought oughts are ought' is a version of 'nothing will come of nothing'. Naipaul builds his fiction on models and the Lear model helps him to universalize his story, contributes to the metaphysical dimension of the novel in which nature is treated as alien, uncaring, and in which people must existentially create their own significance by their actions. The parallels recall in King Lear the importance of society, of nurture as opposed to raw nature.

To have lived and died as one had been born, unnecessary and unaccommodated' (pp. 18 Biswas is Shakespeare's poor unaccommodated man. His often repeated chant from schooldays that 'ought oughts are ought' is a version of 'nothing will come of nothing'. Naipaul builds his fiction on models and the Lear model helps him to universalize his story, contributes to the metaphysical dimension of the novel in which nature is treated as alien, uncaring, and in which people must existentially create their own significance by their actions.

In which the central character seemingly overcomes a personal history of failure to triumph, but the triumph itself is pathetic. Morgan finally gets recognition as a maker of fireworks when he bums down his house and runs away. While this is Naipaul the ironist, it shows the personal and social consequences of distress. The early stories show a world of men without purpose. While the men treat their women as inferiors, their world is held together by women; the failure of the men is typified by their relation to, and lack of, women.

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